Adamantium Bullet
4Oct/18

31 Days Of Horror: INFERNO

For the next 31 days, we here at Adamantium Bullet will be reviewing one horror film a day leading up to Halloween. Each film will be horrific, terrifying, chilling, pulse-pounding, or flat-out awful. All will be endured in honor of the season. Expect SPOILERS. Welcome to Adamantium Bullet’s “All 80s” edition of 31 DAYS OF HORROR.

In this episode, J Bryant and AngieBee discuss writer/director Dario Argento's gloriously grisly 1980 horror epic INFERNO starring Daria Nicolodi and Irene Miracle.

A young woman stumbles upon a mysterious diary that reveals the secrets of 'The Three Mothers' and unleashes a nightmare world of demonic evil. As the unstoppable horror spreads from Rome to New York City, this unholy trinity must be stopped before the world is submerged in the blood of the innocent.

Eleven people and two sacks full of cats (maybe 20?) die on-screen.

While attempting to drown two sacks full of cats (!), old man Kazanian (Sacha Pitoeff) falls into a lake, is attacked by bloodthirsty rats (!!), and is ultimately finished off when some random dude selling hot dogs walks on water (!!!) to join the murder party and partially decapitate him with a chef’s knife.

No actual nudity, but Rose (Irene Miracle) swims and runs about in a wet, clingy, see through dress in opening act.

We were very tempted to give this to the MOST MEMORABLE KILL, but the best bit is when Mater Tenebrarum reveals herself and the film literally comes to a crashing halt. Literally. That’s not a joke. The film literally ends. It’s just over. Writer/Director Dario Argento doesn’t give a single minute to allow anyone to process what just happened. It just happens and the film is over. Roll credits. Not sure if this bit was a stroke of genius or an openly antagonistic gesture to the audience. It might have been both.

Despite seeming intelligent and resourceful when first introduced, Sara (Eleonora Giorgi) quickly reveals herself to be a standard issue “Horror Movie Dummy” when, while researching the “Three Mothers” at her local library, she flees some mysterious voices by hiding out in a spooky basement, rather than going out the front door, and then asking the old crone practicing black magic down there where the exit is.

INFERNO is loaded with “WTF?!?” MOMENTS, but the biggest howler, by far, has to be Mark’s (Leigh McCloskey) super laid back reaction when he discovers Sara’s corpse. He just stands there. No tears. No fear. No shock. No nothing. Not sure if this is bad acting or a stylistic choice made by Argento. Either way, it’s the winner of this category. Hands down.

> In an interview with assistant director Lamberto Bava, he said that he handled and wrangled so many cats during the shooting of this film that afterward he could no longer stand to be in the same room as a cat. He's avoided them since then.

> James Woods was the original choice for the lead role but he was already committed to VIDEODROME (1983).

> Reportedly Dario Argento was ill with a serve case of hepatitis throughout the production. At one point, he had to be bedridden for a few days leaving the production to work on only second unit. Argento has since called INFERNO perhaps his most challenging film for this reason alone.

> According to the book "Mario Bava: All the Colors of the Dark" by Tim Lucas, Sacha Pitoëff's death scene was filmed on location in Central Park during the summer of 1979. Production Coordinator William Lustig said of this: "They filmed the actor carrying a bag that contained some kind of moving mechanism, to make it look like it was full of cats. He walked into the lake, pushed the bag underwater, and fell in. At that point, some phony mechanical rats were attached to him for close-ups. When the guy at the hamburger stand runs over the lake... that guy was actually running on a Plexiglas bridge under the water; it made it look like he was actually running across the surface of the lake. All of the stuff with the live rats was shot back in Europe."

> The USELESS KNOWLEDGE portion of this article was sourced from Wikipedia and IMDB.

Posted by AngieBee

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